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  • 28-July-2018

    English

    Including unpaid household activities: an estimate of its impact on macro-economic indicators in the G7 economies and the way forward

    Statistics Working Paper N. 91 2018/4 - The System of National Accounts, which provides information on important macroeconomic indicators such as Gross Domestic Product (GDP), household disposable income and final consumption, typically excludes the value of unpaid household activities. This report deals with the impact of including unpaid household activities on macro-economic aggregates for G7-countries.

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  • 6-November-2017

    English

    Understanding Financial Accounts

    Understanding Financial Accounts seeks to show how a range of questions on financial developments can be answered with the framework of financial accounts and balance sheets, by providing non-technical explanations illustrated with practical examples: What are the basic principles, concepts and definitions used for this framework which is part of the system of national accounts? What sources and which methodologies are used for their compilation? How are these used to monitor and analyse economic and financial developments? What can we learn about the 2007-2009 economic and financial crisis when looking at the numbers provided in this framework? What can we learn about financial risks and vulnerabilities? This publication is intended for young statisticians, students, journalists, economists, policy makers and citizens, who want to know more about the statistics that are at the heart of the analysis of financial developments in OECD economies.
  • 20-September-2017

    English

    Eurostat-OECD compilation guide on inventories - 2017 edition

    The Eurostat-OECD compilation guide on inventories represents the first comprehensive overview of conceptual and practical issues related to the compilation of the balance-sheet item ‘inventories’ in the national accounts.The estimation of inventories and changes in inventories in national accounts is often very difficult. Therefore it is the aim of this compilation guide to provide conceptual and practical guidance to statisticians on the estimation and valuation of inventories in mutual coherence with the transaction changes in inventories, and by doing so, to increase international comparability for these items. The guide clarifies theoretical concepts and possible data sources. It elaborates several estimation methods for both the asset inventories and the transaction changes in inventories, including their breakdowns into products, industries and institutional sectors. The compilation guide also addresses several special estimation cases and provides the results of a questionnaire — completed by 34 countries — on country practices regarding the estimation of inventories.The Eurostat-OECD compilation guide on inventories was prepared by the Task Force on Land and other non-financial assets under the joint leadership of Eurostat and the OECD. Representatives from various European Union (EU) and non-EU OECD countries were represented as well as the European Central Bank.
  • 21-July-2017

    English

    Can potential mismeasurement of the digital economy explain the post-crisis slowdown in GDP and productivity growth?

    Statistics Working Paper N. 85, 2017/9 - The digital economy has created some new measurement challenges for macroeconomic statistics and may have exacerbated some older ones, raising some concerns about the scope and estimation of GDP. Against a backdrop of slowing rates of measured productivity growth, this has raised questions about the conceptual basis of GDP and output...

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  • 11-April-2017

    English

    A primer on government-sponsored pension schemes in the national accounts and their impact on the interpretation of government debt statistics

    Statistics Working Paper N. 81, 2017/5 - Government debt has many characteristics and thus cannot be fully captured by one indicator. There are several different ways of defining government debt, and each definition can lead to different interpretations of a government’s financial situation. This working paper will summarise some of the major differences in defining and measuring government debt and, based on available data, ...

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  • 14-January-2017

    English

    Expert Group on Disparities in a National Accounts Framework: results from the 2015 exercise

    Statistics Working Paper N. 76, 2016/10 - In 2011, an Expert Group was launched to carry out a feasibility study on the compilation of distributional measures of income, consumption and wealth across household groups consistent with national accounts data. This group developed a methodology on the basis of which first experimental results on income, consumption and savings according to income quintiles were compiled and published...

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  • 17-June-2016

    English

    Measuring GDP in a digitalised economy

    Statistics Working Paper N. 73, 2016/7 - Recent years have seen a rapid emergence of new disruptive technologies with new forms of intermediation, service provision and consumption, with digitalisation being a common characteristic. These include new platforms that facilitate Peer-to-Peer transactions, such as AirBnB and Uber, new activities such as crowd sourcing,...

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  • 23-May-2016

    English

    The drivers of differences between growth in GDP and household adjusted disposable income in OECD countries

    Statistics Working Paper N. 71, 2016/6 - Growth in household income has evolved differently from gross domestic product (GDP) in most OECD countries over the last eighteen years. Using the wealth of information available in the System of National Accounts, this paper provides an assessment of what may be driving this gap

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  • 14-December-2015

    English

    National Accounts at a Glance 2015

    National Accounts at a Glance presents information using an 'indicator' approach, focusing on cross-country comparisons. The aim being to make the national accounts more accessible and informative, whilst, at the same time, taking the opportunity to present the conceptual underpinning of, and comparability issues inherent in, each of the indicators presented. The range of indicators reflects the richness inherent in the national accounts dataset and encourages users to refocus some of the spotlight that is often placed on gross domestic product (GDP) to other economic important indicators, which may better respond to their needs. The publication is broken down into eight key chapters, and provides indicators related to GDP, income, disposable income, expenditure, production, household, government, corporations and capital respectively.
  • 3-July-2015

    English

    Eurostat-OECD Compilation guide on land estimations

    The repercussions of the 2007–2008 financial crisis have acted as an impetus to improve the quality and availability of statistical information. One such initiative addresses the importance of compiling a complete accounting of a nation’s wealth, and especially the wealth of households. This is of particular importance in view of the housing market’s role in the financial crisis in several countries.The most valuable item on the households’ balance sheet is usually housing wealth which is composed of the value of the dwelling and its underlying land. Many countries experience difficulties in valuing land and in particular separating the value of the land from the value of the structure. To assist countries, the Eurostat-OECD compilation guide on land estimation represents the first comprehensive overview of conceptual and practical issues related to the compilation of the balance sheet item land in the national accounts, in total and by institutional sector.The Eurostat-OECD compilation guide on land estimation was prepared by the Task Force on Land and other non-financial assets under the joint leadership of Eurostat and the OECD. Representatives from various European Union (EU) and non-EU OECD countries were represented as well as the European Central Bank.
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