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  • 6-mai-2024

    Français

    Améliorer l’éducation, la concurrence et l’atténuation du changement climatique ainsi que l’adaptation à ses effets : Des priorités essentielles pour la Nouvelle-Zélande

    L’économie de la Nouvelle-Zélande est en phase de rééquilibrage régulier, après une période de surchauffe consécutive à la pandémie de COVID-19 et, plus récemment, un épisode de croissance atone. La croissance économique repart lentement et l’inflation ralentit.

    Documents connexes
  • 25-April-2024

    English

    Improving public sector capacity-strengthening support for small island developing states

    Given the fast pace of global socio-economic development, more tailored, focused, and localised efforts to strengthen public sector capacity in small island developing states (SIDS) is increasingly important. SIDS have unique vulnerabilities, rich histories and contexts, and strengths that can be harnessed for sustainable development. Development partners need to adapt how they provide capacity-strengthening support, taking individual SIDS’ circumstances and needs into account to better help them achieve their ambitions. This report summarises perspectives from small island developing states (SIDS) on current experiences and opportunities to improve capacity-strengthening support to make it more tailored, impactful, and sustainable. The report uses the broad definition of capacity-strengthening as activities that improve the competencies and abilities of individuals, organisations, and broader formal and informal social structures in a way that boosts organisational performance. It concentrates on public sector capacity, including interactions with other stakeholders across sectors.
  • 4-December-2023

    English

    Multi-level governance and subnational finance in Asia and the Pacific

    Subnational governments in Asia and the Pacific are key providers of the public services and infrastructure required to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Given this role, it is essential that policymakers and development partners understand and support the effective functioning of multi-level governance structures and subnational government finances across the region. This joint OECD-ADB report provides a comprehensive overview of subnational governments across Asia and the Pacific. It covers over 467,000 subnational governments from 26 countries, which represent 53% of the world’s population and 40% of global GDP. On average in 2020, subnational governments in the region accounted for 29% of total public expenditure (8.8% of GDP), 35% of total public revenue (8.5% of GDP) and 38% of public investment (2% of GDP). Harnessing unique data from the 3rd edition of the OECD-UCLG World Observatory on Subnational Government Finance and Investment, the analysis highlights how decentralisation and territorial reforms have reconfigured the structures and finances of subnational governments in the region. It covers a range of topics including fiscal rules, financial management capacity, priority-based budgeting, asset management and the use of public-private partnerships.
  • 7-November-2023

    English, PDF, 152kb

    Health at a Glance 2023: Key findings for New Zealand

    Health at a Glance provides the latest comparable data and trends on population health and health system performance. This Country Note shows how New Zealand compares to other OECD countries across indicators in the report.

  • 11-mai-2023

    Français

    Examens de l'OCDE sur la coopération pour le développement : Nouvelle-Zélande 2023

    Le Comité d’aide au développement (CAD) de l’OCDE mène tous les cinq à six ans un examen par les pairs qui passe en revue les efforts de coopération pour le développement de chacun de ses membres. Ces examens visent à améliorer la qualité et l’efficacité de leur coopération pour le développement, en mettant en évidence les bonnes pratiques et en recommandant des améliorations. La Nouvelle-Zélande est un partenaire apprécié dans le Pacifique, principale région bénéficiaire de son aide publique au développement (APD). Sous la responsabilité du ministère des Affaires étrangères et du Commerce, l’attachement à l’appropriation nationale et régionale, les efforts déployés pour intégrer le savoir et les valeurs autochtones, ainsi que les engagements pris pour accroître les financements climatiques témoignent de l’engagement de la Nouvelle-Zélande et de la pertinence de son action. Cet examen par les pairs recommande à la Nouvelle-Zélande de tirer le meilleur parti de l’intégration plus étroite de la politique étrangère et de la politique de développement dans le Pacifique, de renforcer les ressources humaines, de créer les conditions nécessaires à une prise de décision efficace et efficiente, d’améliorer la transparence, de favoriser une meilleure compréhension de la problématique du développement au sein de la population, de promouvoir les liens entre les investissements liés au climat et d’autres priorités, et d’établir un plan pour accroître l’APD, de manière à concrétiser ses objectifs stratégiques.
  • 27-April-2023

    English

    New Zealand 2023 Energy Policy Review

    New Zealand has set ambitious targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, including achieving net zero emissions by 2050. The country enjoys many natural advantages for its energy transition, including an enviable renewable resource base. New Zealand already has a low‑emissions electricity system, with significant production from both hydropower and geothermal, and therefore has an attractive opportunity to leverage this clean electricity to decarbonise end-user sectors. This will require not only sizeable technological investments to efficiently electrify transport and industry, but will also necessitate a sizeable buildout of additional renewables generation capacity, along with supplemental grid and storage investments. Notably, the transport sector accounts for the highest share of emissions and is almost entirely dependent on oil. Industry is also a major contributor to New Zealand’s emissions and is heavily reliant on fossil fuels. In this report, the IEA provides energy policy recommendations to help New Zealand effectively manage the transformation of its energy sector in line with its climate targets.
  • 26-April-2023

    English

    Aid at a glance charts

    These ready-made tables and charts provide for snapshot of aid (Official Development Assistance) for all DAC Members as well as recipient countries and territories. Summary reports by regions (Africa, America, Asia, Europe, Oceania) and the world are also available.

    Related Documents
  • 25-April-2023

    English

    Taxing Wages: Key findings for New Zealand

    The tax wedge for the average single worker in New Zealand increased by 0.7 percentage points from 19.4% in 2021 to 20.1% in 2022. The OECD average tax wedge in 2022 was 34.6% (2021, 34.6%).

  • 30-March-2023

    English

    Not lost in translation - The implications of machine translation technologies for language professionals and for broader society

    The paper discusses the implications of recent advances in artificial intelligence for knowledge workers, focusing on possible complementarities and substitution between machine translation tools and language professionals. The emergence of machine translation tools could enhance social welfare through enhanced opportunities for inter-language communication but also create new threats because of persisting low levels of accuracy and quality in the translation output. The paper uses data on online job vacancies to map the evolution of the demand for language professionals between 2015 and 2019 in 10 countries and illustrates the set of skills that are considered important by employers seeking to hire language professionals through job vacancies posted on line.
  • 21-March-2023

    English

    Building a Skilled Cyber Security Workforce in Five Countries - Insights from Australia, Canada, New Zealand, United Kingdom, and United States

    As societies become increasingly digital, cyber security has become a priority for individuals, companies and nations. The number of cyber attacks is exceeding defence capabilities, and one reason for this is the lack of an adequately skilled cyber security workforce. This report analyses the demand for cyber security professionals in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States using information contained in online job postings. The analysis looks at recent trends in the demand for workers in different types of cyber security roles, the geographical distribution of cyber security job postings, and the changing skill requirements for professionals in this field. The report also looks at the supply side, zooming in on the landscape of cyber security education and training programmes in England (United Kingdom). It describes the different types of programmes provided in further and higher education, the profile of learners in these programmes and their outcomes. Finally, the report also looks at policies and initiatives adopted in England to make cyber security education and training programmes more accessible and relevant. This report is part of a larger initiative examining the evolution of policies and experiences in the cyber security profession around the world.
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